crochet · crochet pattern · DIY wardrobe · pattern · sweater

Chloe Cardigan:A Crocheted Sweater

Hi Crocheters,

Today I’m sharing a crocheted sweater design and pattern with you. I released the Chloe Cardigan in February 2015 and it’s been shared by a few people on Ravelry who look great in it!


Chloe is a hip-length cocoon cardi with very simple shaping. The sweater is constructed from a trapezoid shape that creates the back and shoulders in one piece. The shawl collar and body front is worked directly onto the back & shoulder piece. Finally sleeves are worked seamlessly onto the body to create an elegant, easy-fit jacket with no closures, and three-quarter sleeves that are universally flattering. The silhouette is comfortable and modern with drape that skims the body’s curves. If you are new to making sweaters, Chloe’s clever seamless construction is a fun way to get started.


If you are looking for a great layering piece for spring and summer, try Chloe! Below are some links you can use to buy the PDF pattern for Chloe from your favorite platform: Ravelry, Etsy, or Craftsy.

 on Ravelry

Buy Now on Etsy

Buy Now on Craftsy



crochet · crochet pattern · DIY wardrobe · pattern · sweater

Thisbe Jacket: Crochet Cardigan Pattern

Hello Crocheters,

Today I’m sharing Thisbe, a Boho-fabulous lace jacket perfect to crochet for the warm weather that I hope is finally here to stay!

Thisbe’s PDF pattern download contains full written instructions along with stitch pattern charts to guide you through the lovely and interesting lace that makes up the front and back body. The design is written for six sizes: Small-3X.

The jacket is worked sideways in two pieces from the center out. Your foundation chain creates both the front and back of one side of the jacket, you work all the way out to the shoulder, then decrease for the 3/4 sleeve. The opposite back/front piece is seamlessly worked onto the existing center and crocheted in the same manner out to the other 3/4 sleeve cuff.

Some ravishing Ravelers have made Thisbe, so check them out to see how it went!

Here are links to purchase Thisbe from your favorite pattern shop: Ravelry, Etsy, or Craftsy.

buy now on Ravelry

buy now on Etsy

buy now on Craftsy

colorwork · crochet · crochet pattern · tutorial

Candy Shop Crochet Cardigan

 

Hi Crocheters,

Today, I’m sharing my first crocheted granny square sweater design with you.

How I love a granny square sweater! I’m forever collecting these colorful wonders of happy crochet goodness on Pinterest.

I recently finished a tiny granny square sweater for my daughter. The Candy Shop Cardigan sweater is my own design, sized for 2T-3T. I have not produced a full pattern for this design, but below I am sharing a tutorial if you’d like to make your own version!

Missie loves her sweater, and it’s been the perfect substitute for her winter coat this spring with all the cool, rainy days and chilly mornings we’ve had. She often goes to the peg where it hangs and reaches for it. It warms my heart that she loves her colorful crochet! It makes weaving in all those yarn ends totally worth it.

And there are a lot, believe me.

A. Lot.

😉

Miss Mouse is awfully sweet! But do you see a glint of mischief in her eyes? I do.
This book is appropriate for working with geometric motifs!
Sure enough, she goes right to a tiny square.
Mama’s gonna kiss those cheeks!
You like spunk? We’ve got spunk for days.
Colorful ribbing at the neck and hem reminds me of candy straws.
Choosing buttons was tricky, but I thought, “why hold back?…”
…because color makes my heart go pitter-pat.
♥ Ta-Da! The incredibly sweet Candy Shop Cardigan ♥

Tutorial

Sweater Specs:

Size 2T-3T

Finished Chest Circumference: 26.5″

Finished Length (shoulder to hem): 11.5″ This is slightly cropped jacket length on my LSG, but she has a long waist and is getting closer to 3T size these days.

Finished Measurement of Center Back Neck to Cuff: 17″

Button Front Cardigan (you’ll need six 1 1/8″ buttons)

Drop shoulder shape

Crew neck

Long sleeves

Hook:

Size G US/6 4.00 mm crochet hook

Yarn:

DK weight (#3 Light)

60% acrylic/40% polyamide

I used 17 skeins in a rainbow of candy colors

Brand: Baby Bee Sweet Delight from Hobby Lobby

Gauge: 

Each Tiny Square = 1.9″ square worked in DK weight yarn on size G/6 (4.0 mm) hook.

How to make a Tiny Granny Square:


With First Color

Make adjustable ring.

Round 1: Ch 3, 2 dc (ch 2-3 dc) 3 times into ring, ch 2, slip stitch to top of turning chain to close round.

Fasten off. Break yarn leaving 6″ tail

With Second Color

Round 2: Join yarn at any 2-chain space, ch 3, 2 dc-ch 2-3 dc in same 2-chain space, (3dc – ch 2 – 3 dc in next 2-chain space) 3 times, slip stitch to top of turning chain to close round.

Fasten off. Break yarn leaving 6″ tail.

How to make a Tiny Triangle:


With First Color

Make adjustable ring.

Round 1: Ch 4 (counts as dc + 1 chain), 3 dc – ch 2 – 3 dc, ch 1, dc into ring, do not turn.

Round 2: with RS of motif facing you, slip stitch to top of turning chain to close round.

With Second Color

Round 2: With right side of motif facing you, join yarn at first chain space, ch 4 (counts as dc + 1 chain), 3 dc in same chain space (3 dc – ch 2 – 3 dc) in next 2-chain space, (3 dc – ch 1 – dc) in last chain-space.

Tips:

  • After making a square, tighten center yarn tail of adjustable ring and take time to weave in yarn ends after each square or after each sitting. This project has a lot of yarn ends.
  • Try to work colors randomly to create that delightful candy shop effect. Avoid making the same sequence of colors for an unstudied effect of joyous color!
  • Take your time with the layout of squares to make sure you don’t have areas of similar color clustering together.
  • I learned a great trick for working with color from an interview with the amazing needle artist and colorist, Kaffe Fassett–squint your eyes and see what color jumps out at you and says it isn’t working. I have been doing this and it’s really helped! I did this a lot in the yarn shop when I was buying my huge palette of yarns.

To Make the Sweater:

Make 113 Tiny Granny Squares.

Make 6 Tiny Triangles.

Use the diagram below to lay out your squares. Note that the red squares and triangles represent the motifs and the orange edges represent the ribbed bands, cuffs, and button bands.

Tiny Square and Tiny Triangle Layout

Take your time to make sure you have the squares placed just as you want them. You may need to take a break and come back with fresh eyes. Try the squinting trick! (See Tips).

I spent awhile fussing with my layout to make sure no colors were too close to each other.

Oops! I’m missing a square at the right neck edge!

Join your squares and triangles into rows, then join rows to rows.

I held my motifs together with right sides facing and slip-stitched the back loops of the V’s on top of the stitches.

For more help with joining, see this lovely tutorial .

The yarn ends never seem (seam?) to, err…end (heh heh).

Finishing

Slip stitch or seam sleeve and body seams together at right side and left side of sweater.

Hem Rib:

With the right side of the sweater facing you, join a color at the Left Front hem corner.

Row 1 (RS): Ch 2, hdc an odd number of stitches evenly across hem, turn. Fasten off, break yarn leaving a 6″ tail.

Row 2: With a new color, ch 2 (counts as 1 fphdc/front-post half double crochet), *bphdc/back-post half double crochet in next st, fphdc in next st; repeat from *, turn. Fasten off, break yarn leaving a 6″ tail.

Row 3-8: Use a new color for every row. Ch 2 (counts as post stitch), work each stitch as it presents itself. If it appears as a fphdc, work an fphdc over that stitch and if it appears as a bphdc, work a bphdc over that stitch. Fasten off, break yarn leaving a 6″ tail.

Row 9: Use the same color you used in Row 1. Repeat Row 3.Fasten off, break yarn leaving a 6″ tail.

Neckband:

With the right side of the sweater facing you, join a color at the Right Front neck corner.

Use same color sequence as for Hem Rib.

Work Rows 1-9 as for Hem Rib.

Button Band:

With the right side of the sweater facing you, join a color at the Neckband corner of the Left Front.

Use same color sequence as for Hem Rib.

Work Rows 1-9 as for Hem Rib.

Buttonhole Band:

With the right side of the sweater facing you, join a color at the Hem Rib edge of the Right Front.

Use same color sequence as for Hem Rib.

Work Rows 1-4 as for Hem Rib.

Row 5: Create 6 evenly spaced buttonholes by skipping 2 post-stitches and chaining 2 over the top of them, work in pattern between the buttonholes. Fasten off, break yarn leaving a 6″ tail, turn.

Row 6: Work in pattern, working 2 hdc in each 2-chain space you come to, working in pattern between buttonholes. Fasten off, break yarn leaving a 6″ tail, turn.

Rows 7-9: Work as for Hem Rib.

Cuffs (make 2):

With right side of sweater facing, join a color at the seam of a sleeve opening.

Use same color sequence as for Rows 1-3 of Hem Rib.

Work Rows 1-3 as for Hem Rib.

Row 4: Use same color as for Row 1. Work as for Hem Rib.

Blocking:

I blocked this sweater using gentle steam from a garment steamer.

Later I also pressed it under a warm iron and a press cloth–VERY IMPORTANT.

I love working with acrylic yarns and blends because you can adjust the size and enhance the drape of a sweater with steam/heat. Just be careful and always experiment on swatches first. Okay? Okay.

Care:

This sweater would be machine washable based on its yarn selection, HOWEVER, I would only hand-wash this on very rare occasions to avoid any trouble with the yarn ends coming loose in the washing machine. I’m a little paranoid about it after a certain heart-breaking episode that involved a freshly completed baby blanket and washing machine spin cycle. But that is a story for another time when I have an adult beverage in hand.

Anyway!

There you have it! My tutorial for the Candy Shop Cardigan.

If you think doing this much work to create a sweater for a toddler who loves playing in the dirt and is growing like a weed is CRAZY…

…you have a point.

But I loved making this project. Yes, it was a big challenge with tons of finishing details, but I loved playing with all these colors and get lots of sweet satisfaction when I see my little gal looking warm and happy in it. A happy make!

Now I want one for myself, but I’ll have to let my stamina build up again. Do you think this style would be wearable for an adult? I’d probably use a palette of soft, dusty colors and make it from sport-weight wool. That way it would last my entire lifetime.

It had better!

 

p.s. If you enjoyed this post, check out my post about creative projects you can make with just a few granny squares!

Yours in Stitches,

Sara

A little CoD, anyone? 😉

 

 

 

book talk · crochet · crochet pattern

Interweave Presents: Classic Crochet Shawls!

Hi Shawl Lovers,

Happy news came my way back in February and it’s time to share it! Three of my crocheted shawl designs from Poetic Crochet have been included in a new book from Interweave. Classic Crochet Shawls: 20 Free-Spirited Designs Featuring Lace, Color, and More is available for pre-order and will be out on June 21, 2017.

My inclusions are Endymion, which I am so proud to say received the cover shot for the book, along with Dover, which has been a favorite of many lovely crocheters who have reached out to me since the book was published, and Jessamine.

Here is the romantic cover with an image I had never even seen from Poetic Crochet! What a treat that was for a designer.

 

And a few images of my projects that were included:

Poetic Crochet - Dover beauty image
Dover

 

Poetic Crochet - Jessamine beauty image
Jessamine

 

Poetic Crochet - Endymion beauty image
Endymion

I can’t wait to get my contributor’s copy in the mail. This collection features some gorgeous work by my favorite designers.  For the love of crocheted shawls!

In Stitches,

Sara

chitchat · crochet · crochet pattern · free pattern · one skein wonder · pattern

In the Press: Perfectly Pink Headband

Hi Crocheters,

Update 3/4/2017:

This pattern has been out for over one year, so I can now offer it to you free! Enjoy.

Free PDF Pattern Download: perfectly-pink-headband

I Like Crochet Magazine published a fun little design of mine in their February 2016 issue–the Perfectly Pink Headband!

If you’ve never worked with crochet post stitches, this is an easy design to get you started. I love the woven texture, and it’s pink for Valentine’s Day of course. Also, it’s a one-skein wonder making it a great stash-buster project.

Perfectly-Pink-Headband

Happy Stitching,

Sara Kay

craft writing · crochet · crochet pattern · design process · free pattern · one skein wonder · pattern

Ellie Headband

Hi. Thanks for visiting!

Ellie is a low-stress bit of crocheted fun that I’m very excited to share with you.

1

I’m going to chat a little about the idea behind the design, but if you want to get straight to the juicy stuff, the pattern download awaits you at the bottom of the post. If your scroll wheel spins wildly out of control while I’m in mid-sentence, you won’t hurt my feelings. ♥ ♥ ♥
DSCN0252

For months, I admired all the cute turban-style headbands I was seeing on Pinterest, in boutique shops like Francesca’s, Anthro online, (which I troll for the pretties but have never visited a brick-and-mortar store) and of course in mass-market discount stores as well. DSCN0238

I found a few sewing tutorials for making them from 2 tubes of fabric crossed over one another and sewn together with a seam at the back. Ever intrigued by the the voodoo magic of twisting rectangles into something interesting and wearable, [Knitters, see Miss Sadie. Crocheters, see Pip & Emma.] I thought, okay I’m in.

I thought that in crochet, there might be an even easier to create the wrap top without having to stitch 2 separate strips.

There is.
DSCN0239

By crocheting a single long strip…

centering it at the nape of your neck…

criss-crossing into a full twist at your forehead….

stitching down the two short ends to the opposite sides of the band…

and turning the headband right side out…

you get the turban twist from a single strip with no visible stitching!

This method is nice because you can size it perfectly to your [daughter’s/sister’s/roommate’s] head and there’s no double-thickness of crochet fabric beneath you fashionably messy bun or pony tail.

The stitch pattern is just alternate rows of half-double crochet with single crochet which gives a surprisingly nice fabric with a honeycomb look. It’s plain enough to show the knot design, textured enough to keep it interesting, and has enough flexibility to allow the crossed strips to squish softly together without flipping over or pinching over in an awkward way.2

Fun to design! And fun for you to make, I hope!

Here’s the PDF pattern download, just for you.

Ellie Headband

♥ knit, crochet, love; rep from ♥ forever.

Sara Kay