design process · DIY wardrobe · free pattern · handknitting · knitting · knitting pattern · one skein wonder · pattern

Lace Beret, A Free Knitting Pattern

Happy Friday, Knitters!

Red Heart Yarns is offering my lovely lace beret design as a free pattern download! It’s sized for adult Small and Medium: 20 (22)” head circumference.

2017-06-02

The skill level on this pretty beret is intermediate because the stitch counts change on certain rows when working the lace, so keep that in mind if you try out the pattern. The beret uses Red Heart’s With Love yarn, which is a plump and soft 100% acrylic yarn. Since it’s not wool, this could be a summertime or winter hat.

Check it out on Ravelry for more details.

2017-06-02 (2)

Thanks for visiting me today. I hope you are having fun making whatever you are making! Leave me a comment to tell me about it.

Yours In Stitches,

Sara

crochet · crochet pattern · DIY wardrobe · pattern · sweater

Chloe Cardigan:A Crocheted Sweater

Hi Crocheters,

Today I’m sharing a crocheted sweater design and pattern with you. I released the Chloe Cardigan in February 2015 and it’s been shared by a few people on Ravelry who look great in it!


Chloe is a hip-length cocoon cardi with very simple shaping. The sweater is constructed from a trapezoid shape that creates the back and shoulders in one piece. The shawl collar and body front is worked directly onto the back & shoulder piece. Finally sleeves are worked seamlessly onto the body to create an elegant, easy-fit jacket with no closures, and three-quarter sleeves that are universally flattering. The silhouette is comfortable and modern with drape that skims the body’s curves. If you are new to making sweaters, Chloe’s clever seamless construction is a fun way to get started.


If you are looking for a great layering piece for spring and summer, try Chloe! Below are some links you can use to buy the PDF pattern for Chloe from your favorite platform: Ravelry, Etsy, or Craftsy.

 on Ravelry

Buy Now on Etsy

Buy Now on Craftsy



craft writing · design process · DIY wardrobe · dressmaking · sewing

Little Lady’s Tea Party Dress

Hello Sewists,

Today I’m sharing a sweet toddler dress I just finished. It’s a generously sized 3T midi length dress that could also work as a tunic top for 4T. It’s a bit big on my little lady (hovering between 2T-3T) right now, but we’ll wear it anyway and hopefully get lots of future wear out of it too!

 

I bought this whimsical Alice in Wonderland themed Cotton & Steel fabric from my local sewing shop when I went in for a relaxing, baby-free browse a couple of months ago.

 

I used my self-drafted toddler dress pattern for a sleeveless A-line dress, cutting a front on the fold and 2 back pieces. I serged the back and side seams to construct the dress, leaving the back neck opening un-sewn. I used double-fold 1/6″ (-ish) hems on the neck opening, neckline, and armholes instead of the bias binding method I’ve used up to now. Truthfully, I procrastinated awhile on this project after cutting the dress pieces because I was dreading that bias binding process. I had reached a point where I needed to knock this project out so I could go on to other things, so I decided:

“It’s my project, and maybe hemming the neck and armholes is not officially sanctioned by the imaginary craft police, but I’m going to try it.”

 

As a completely self-taught crafter, I often worry that I’m doing things wrong or my skills aren’t good enough. Perfectionism or the straight-up fear of not being good enough have stymied my progress more times than I like to think about. Lately my battle cry (in my own head, though sometimes I do say it out loud) has been “progress, not perfection” along with “practice,” and “try it and see what happens.” This mindset is where my creativity thrives–in a state of curiosity, experimentation, and finding solutions to unexpected problems on the road to my goal. But occasionally the imaginary craft police (a nasty set of wenches) show up just as I’m starting to have a good time. They are headquartered in a town called Evaluation seated in the heart of Criticism County. They always come in groups and say nasty things, like mean girls.

With my DIY wardrobe projects, I remind myself that a project only needs to be good enough for me. 

My work doesn’t need to pass an imaginary judging by these uptight, sniffy sewists who would enjoy telling me how I can and can’t or should and shouldn’t do things. They stand with crossed arms, glance at each other, and whisper things like “well, if she wants everyone to know that’s homemade, sure, I guess she can go ahead and do it that way” or “if she doesn’t care about learning to do things the right way, we won’t interfere” or worst of all, “I guess some things are just too hard for her, poor dear. Let her finish her hems that way.”

 

I’ve read enough books about creativity, flow, and innovation to know that the imaginary craft police are bound to join me. But I make them stand in the corner and be quiet. There’s no getting rid of them completely, they are just part of living in Creativeland. And guess what?

 

Once I shut them up, I enjoyed hemming instead of binding! I clipped the armhole curves at less than 1/8″ and pressed, folded over another 1/6″ layer, pressed and pinned, and edge stitched them on my sewing machine.

 

I added the ruffled eyelet trim (right side of eyelet facing wrong side of dress) to sweeten up the whole thing and give it a daintier look. Boil the teakettle! Bring on the crumpets!

 

I used this tutorial to learn how to hand-sew a thread chain to use as a button loop. It is very delicate because I used sewing thread. If it breaks, I will probably re-sew it using embroidery floss or cotton perle instead of thread. Or I might use this sewn button loop tutorial which looks strong and crisp.


And finally, the skirt has a 1/2″ double folded hem. I love how the eyelet peeks out. It’s a little strange that I see smiley faces in the shape of the lace eyelets, but I guess that’s better than frowny faces, right?


Thank you for visiting me today. What are you making? Have the imaginary craft police ever visited you? How do you shut them down? 

In stitches, 

Sara

crochet · crochet pattern · DIY wardrobe · pattern · sweater

Thisbe Jacket: Crochet Cardigan Pattern

Hello Crocheters,

Today I’m sharing Thisbe, a Boho-fabulous lace jacket perfect to crochet for the warm weather that I hope is finally here to stay!

Thisbe’s PDF pattern download contains full written instructions along with stitch pattern charts to guide you through the lovely and interesting lace that makes up the front and back body. The design is written for six sizes: Small-3X.

The jacket is worked sideways in two pieces from the center out. Your foundation chain creates both the front and back of one side of the jacket, you work all the way out to the shoulder, then decrease for the 3/4 sleeve. The opposite back/front piece is seamlessly worked onto the existing center and crocheted in the same manner out to the other 3/4 sleeve cuff.

Some ravishing Ravelers have made Thisbe, so check them out to see how it went!

Here are links to purchase Thisbe from your favorite pattern shop: Ravelry, Etsy, or Craftsy.

buy now on Ravelry

buy now on Etsy

buy now on Craftsy