craft writing · design process · DIY wardrobe · dressmaking · sewing

Little Lady’s Tea Party Dress

Hello Sewists,

Today I’m sharing a sweet toddler dress I just finished. It’s a generously sized 3T midi length dress that could also work as a tunic top for 4T. It’s a bit big on my little lady (hovering between 2T-3T) right now, but we’ll wear it anyway and hopefully get lots of future wear out of it too!

 

I bought this whimsical Alice in Wonderland themed Cotton & Steel fabric from my local sewing shop when I went in for a relaxing, baby-free browse a couple of months ago.

 

I used my self-drafted toddler dress pattern for a sleeveless A-line dress, cutting a front on the fold and 2 back pieces. I serged the back and side seams to construct the dress, leaving the back neck opening un-sewn. I used double-fold 1/6″ (-ish) hems on the neck opening, neckline, and armholes instead of the bias binding method I’ve used up to now. Truthfully, I procrastinated awhile on this project after cutting the dress pieces because I was dreading that bias binding process. I had reached a point where I needed to knock this project out so I could go on to other things, so I decided:

“It’s my project, and maybe hemming the neck and armholes is not officially sanctioned by the imaginary craft police, but I’m going to try it.”

 

As a completely self-taught crafter, I often worry that I’m doing things wrong or my skills aren’t good enough. Perfectionism or the straight-up fear of not being good enough have stymied my progress more times than I like to think about. Lately my battle cry (in my own head, though sometimes I do say it out loud) has been “progress, not perfection” along with “practice,” and “try it and see what happens.” This mindset is where my creativity thrives–in a state of curiosity, experimentation, and finding solutions to unexpected problems on the road to my goal. But occasionally the imaginary craft police (a nasty set of wenches) show up just as I’m starting to have a good time. They are headquartered in a town called Evaluation seated in the heart of Criticism County. They always come in groups and say nasty things, like mean girls.

With my DIY wardrobe projects, I remind myself that a project only needs to be good enough for me. 

My work doesn’t need to pass an imaginary judging by these uptight, sniffy sewists who would enjoy telling me how I can and can’t or should and shouldn’t do things. They stand with crossed arms, glance at each other, and whisper things like “well, if she wants everyone to know that’s homemade, sure, I guess she can go ahead and do it that way” or “if she doesn’t care about learning to do things the right way, we won’t interfere” or worst of all, “I guess some things are just too hard for her, poor dear. Let her finish her hems that way.”

 

I’ve read enough books about creativity, flow, and innovation to know that the imaginary craft police are bound to join me. But I make them stand in the corner and be quiet. There’s no getting rid of them completely, they are just part of living in Creativeland. And guess what?

 

Once I shut them up, I enjoyed hemming instead of binding! I clipped the armhole curves at less than 1/8″ and pressed, folded over another 1/6″ layer, pressed and pinned, and edge stitched them on my sewing machine.

 

I added the ruffled eyelet trim (right side of eyelet facing wrong side of dress) to sweeten up the whole thing and give it a daintier look. Boil the teakettle! Bring on the crumpets!

 

I used this tutorial to learn how to hand-sew a thread chain to use as a button loop. It is very delicate because I used sewing thread. If it breaks, I will probably re-sew it using embroidery floss or cotton perle instead of thread. Or I might use this sewn button loop tutorial which looks strong and crisp.


And finally, the skirt has a 1/2″ double folded hem. I love how the eyelet peeks out. It’s a little strange that I see smiley faces in the shape of the lace eyelets, but I guess that’s better than frowny faces, right?


Thank you for visiting me today. What are you making? Have the imaginary craft police ever visited you? How do you shut them down? 

In stitches, 

Sara

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creativity · design process · dressmaking · pattern · sewing

Sewing Simple Clothes

Hi Fiber Friends,

I’ve been in the throes of a new passion! Drafting and sewing simple sewing patterns from old tank tops and t-shirts in my closet to create my own unique tunic blouses. 


The process for each piece is to cut out the front and back, join shoulder seams, join side seams, and add bias binding to the neckline and armholes. It’s a new skill set for me and I’m loving it.


My desire to wear silky, flowy fabrics has motivated me to complete these projects and has also outstripped my ability to work with these materials, but I’m embracing the learning and the little imperfections that come with handmade items.


This is a tiny paper mock-up of an idea for a tee sewn using a striped fabric. Inspiration is everywhere, even on a mundane grocery list notepad.

Of course, my little mite is getting some new clothes as well: skirts, tunics, dresses, and shorts in cheerful quilting cottons. So fun and sweet!



Now all we need is for the weather to brighten up and warm up again so we can wear our lovelies. I hope you’re enjoying your own makes!

Yours in stitches,

Sara